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Throwback Thursday – How About Some Cornish Hens?

You want to turn the oven on. The warmth and smell of cooking food will go a long way on a cold day. How about some Cornish hens?

Roasted Cornish Hens

I hadn’t had Cornish hens for ages. My late mother-in-law, Helen Mathieu, did a lovely job of stuffing and roasting them. When I happened  to notice them in the meat case, I said “why not?” Although I didn’t have the ambition to make a bread stuffing, I did manage to come up with a good easy alternative.

The Basics: 

Serves 3 to 4 people.

  • 2 Cornish hens
  • 1 large stalk celery, cut into several pieces
  • 1 small onion, cut into chucks
  • Corn oil, or other light oil that produces a crispy skin
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Foil

Roasted Cornish Hens DSC_7896Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Divide cut-up onions and celery in half.

Stuff cavity of hen with onion and celery, packing the vegetables tightly so they don’t fall out.

Place the hens on a rack in a large roasting pan. They will spatter a bit, and the pan will help keep the oven clean.

Brush with oil.

Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

Tent very lightly with foil.

Cook for 30 minutes.

Remove foil.

Brush with more oil.

Cook for about 30 more minutes until tender and cooked through (160 degrees).

Let stand for about 20 minutes with foil arranged loosely on top to keep meat warm while it sits.

Carve gently or cut in half to serve.

Cornish hen, Cornish game hen, or…? Cornish hens are simply young chickens breed for this use. They are mostly white meat.

I served the hens with a salad of baby greens, tomatoes, walnuts and goal cheese.

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