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Super Simple Pot Roast and Applesauce

Looking for some comfort food to get you through the next round of cold weather? Food Sharing Network guest contributor Carmen Kugler shares Nanny Moulder’s Super Simple Pot Roast, as well as a family recipe for applesauce from her mother-in-law, Marion Kugler.

These two lovely ladies are gone, but their good cooking is not forgotten.

Nanny Moulder’s Super Simple Pot Roast

Do note Carmen's Homemade Applesauce

Almost too pretty to eat. Almost!

The Basics:

  • 4 lb beef roast*
  • 1 can golden mushroom soup
  • 1 can tomato soup
  • 1 package dry onion soup mix

Place roast in a slow cooker and cover with golden mushroom soup and tomato soup.

Sprinkle onion soup mix over the top and cook on high for 3 hours.

Turn to low for another hour, if needed.

*Rump or bottom round is usually preferred, but I often use eye round because I hate fat!

Options: You can adjust the amount of soup, adding another can of your preference for a larger piece of meat. The roast can be cooked in the oven at 325 or 350 degrees for an hour per pound if you securely wrap all the ingredients in foil. This makes for a messier cleanup.

The gravy is great as is and not overly fatty if you trim the meat beforehand.

Serve with broad egg noodles or mashed potatoes. My favorite vegetable with this is red cabbage.

I also like to serve homemade applesauce with the pot roast.

My mother-in-law used to amaze me with her warm homemade applesauce. I thought she was related to Betty Crocker. She laughed when she gave me the recipe.

Marion Kugler’s Homemade Applesauce

Peel, core and cut up apples (as many as you like, and whatever kind you prefer or have in the house). This is a good way to use up apples that are a little past their prime.

Bring them to a boil in a saucepan with a bit of water and simmer for 20 minutes or so. How much water? Who knows? Just a little – perhaps 1/4 cup or a little more if you have six or more apples. The fruit releases its own juice as it cooks, but just watch that the apples don’t run dry. If they look too watery once cooked, you can drain some liquid off before you mash them.

After mashing, add some sugar – as much or as little as you like. I probably add at least a rounded tablespoon, and I prefer cinnamon sugar. This applesauce goes nicely with any comfort food and always seems to be in demand at Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner.

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